Tim Garvey | Winchester Real Estate, Medford Real Estate, Woburn Real Estate, Stoneham Real Estate


Image by Kazuky Akayashi from Unsplash

Whether you’re moving down the street or to a different state, it’s important to make sure your pets are prepared for this change. There are several practical things to consider while getting your pets ready for your move. Since you already have a lot to keep track of between packing and planning for moving day, keep the following tips handy to ensure that your pets are fully prepared.

Stock Up on Supplies Before Moving Day

Making sure you have plenty of food for your pets means you’ll have one less thing to worry about on moving day. Plan to purchase enough food to last for at least a couple of weeks after you arrive. If your pets take any medication, ask your vet about stocking enough of it to last for a few extra weeks.

Update Microchip Information and ID Tags

Pets can easily become stressed during a move. With unfamiliar people coming into and out of your home to load or unload the truck, there’a a higher risk of having anxious pets bolt out the door. Before moving day, update the information associated with your pets’ microchips and ID tags in case they get lost.

Stay Current on Vaccines

Making sure your pets have updated vaccines can give you peace of mind if they happen to run off during the transition into your new space. Being updated on vaccines is also helpful if you plan on boarding your pets on moving day. Boarding them may help prevent them from getting lost or feeling overwhelmed.

Visit Your New Home Before Moving Day

If possible, bring your pets over to your new home before you move in. Keep dogs on a leash to make sure they stay safe, and bring cats in carriers that you can easily get them in and out of. Bringing them over before moving day can give them a chance to wander around and explore each room while your new home is empty and quiet. 

Tire Your Pets Out

Tired pets are less likely to act up if they’re feeling stressed or anxious as moving day approaches. In the days before your departure, spend quality time with your pets and keep them active. Run around the yard with your dogs, bring them to the local dog park or take them for extra long walks around the neighborhood. Use toys to keep your cats active and playful. Spending some time with your pets every day can help them feel less anxious about the changes going on around them, such as having boxes all around instead of familiar items. 


A home seller may dread the thought of dealing with an aggressive property buyer, i.e. an individual who submits many requests for property improvements or price reductions prior to the closing of a home sale. Fortunately, we're here to help you take the guesswork out of dealing with an aggressive homebuyer.

Now, let's take a look at three tips to help a home seller get the best-possible results when he or she deals with an aggressive property buyer.

1. Keep Your Cool

Let's face it – an aggressive homebuyer may test your patience. But if you remain calm, cool and collected when you deal with an aggressive homebuyer, you may be better equipped than ever before to accomplish your desired home selling results.

Remember, the ultimate goal of the house selling journey is to maximize your property sale earnings. If you remain open to communication with a buyer, both you and this individual can work together to find common ground. And as a result, you and a buyer can collaborate to achieve the optimal results.

2. Know Your Options

If a buyer makes exorbitant requests during the home selling journey, it is important to keep in mind that you have options. And if problems start to escalate, you may be able to walk away from a property selling agreement.

For example, if an aggressive buyer conducts a home inspection and asks for a massive price reduction following the evaluation, you can still negotiate with this buyer. And if you and the buyer cannot come to terms, there is no need to stress. At this point, you can move on from a potential home sale and re-list your residence.

3. Hire a Real Estate Agent

Dealing with an aggressive homebuyer can be worrisome. For sellers who want to avoid the potential dangers associated with dealing with an aggressive buyer, it may be beneficial to hire a real estate agent.

In addition to guiding you along the property selling journey, a real estate agent is happy to help you negotiate with a buyer and his or her agent. That way, you can boost the likelihood of enjoying a quick, profitable house selling experience.

Typically, a real estate agent will serve as a liaison between you and a buyer. And if a buyer requests property upgrades or a price reduction prior to closing day, a real estate agent can offer recommendations about how to proceed with these requests.

A real estate agent also is available to respond to any of your home selling concerns or questions. This housing market professional understands the property selling experience can cause a seller to worry, especially if this individual is forced to deal with an aggressive buyer. But with a real estate agent's assistance, a seller can take the necessary steps to minimize potential property selling hurdles.

Simplify a negotiation with an aggressive homebuyer – use the aforementioned tips, and any home seller can seamlessly navigate a negotiation with any buyer, at any time.


When pests come into your home, there’s no creepier feeling that you may have as a homeowner. You may turn to your house insurance for assistance if the problem gets really bad. Let’s say that termites have taken over your home and gotten into your walls or foundation. Maybe mice have gotten into the walls of your home, or a squirrel has caused some major issues in the attic. Whatever the problem is, you want to remedy it quickly. It might be an expensive fix no matter what, but it has to be remedied for you to continue to live comfortably in your home. 


The Truth About Homeowners Insurance


Unfortunately, homeowners insurance doesn't cover pest infestations. It doesn’t matter if the termites have literally eaten you out of house and home, the insurance companies consider pests to be an avoidable problem. Even though you may wonder how bugs can be considered “avoidable,” it’s simple. The insurance company believes that regular maintenance and checking of your property can help to prevent bug infestations. This is why it’s so important to take care of your property and not neglect it. 


Collateral Damage


There are a few exceptions to the rule. If your ceiling caves in and it was caused by some of the pest damage, your insurance may cover the cost of the repairs to the ceiling. They may not cover the materials that are needed to repair the ceiling itself. Insurance claims can be tricky, so you’ll need to ask a lot of questions if these problems do occur for you.


What Homeowners Insurance Covers


There’s nothing more frustrating than paying an insurance premium to find out that it doesn’t actually cover anything that you need at a certain point and time. As a general rule, homeowners insurance policies cover things that are considered accidental. This would include natural disasters like hurricanes, hailstorms, or high winds. If a tree falls on your home due to a windstorm, there was really no way of preventing that from happening. Your insurance would cover this. Damage that happens over an extended period, like that of a pest infestation or an aging home generally is not covered by house insurance. 


Separate Policies


Some insurance companies do offer separate policies to cover damage from certain types of pests like termites. There are several varieties of insects that cause damage to wood structures, so these policies may be more general stating that they provide “wood destroying insect” coverage. If you live in an area that’s prone to termites, there’s a few options available to you including something called “termite bonds.”


Your best course of action as a homeowner is prevention. Keep up with regular maintenance around your home and inspect your home regularly for any problems that you may find.



89 Chester Street, Boston, MA 02134

Rental

$1,775
Price

2
Rooms
1
Beds
1
Baths
Recently painted and refinished hardwood floors (within 18 months) magnify the light and bright feel of this corner studio with high ceilings and just the right amount of space. Open floor plan, walk-in closet, laundry in the building. Updated eat-in kitchen and updated bath. Pretty vintage brick building with welcoming entry courtyard and bicycle storage in the basement. Close proximity to Packard's Corner and Boston University, PLUS Allston's convenient amenities (when opened back up), restaurants, night life and shopping. NO pets allowed. Available immediately!
Open House
No scheduled Open Houses

Similar Properties




 Photo by bidvine via Pixabay

Some home projects and improvements can't wait - a leaking hot water heater or a water damaged floor need to be replaced right away. Other, planned renovations and upgrades are optional. Consider not only your current needs, but the potential impact of any large planned upgrade on your home's value before you proceed. If you are upgrading your home to sell it soon, the improvements you make should add value to your home and be recouped when you are ready to sell. 

4 Home Improvements that Add the Most Value to your Home (and 3 That Don't)

Some upgrades enhance the overall value of your home, while others allow you to improve the look of your home, and recover the majority of your costs when you sell. According to Bankrate.com, the best places to invest your upgrade dollars include: 

A new garage door: It may not be fancy or a feature you notice, but replacing a sagging, out of date or ailing garage door with a newer, more secure model is a money savvy upgrade. The average garage upgrade costs about $3,600 -- and adds about $3,500 to the selling price of the home, making this a renovation that (almost) pays for itself. 

Kitchen Update: Bringing a dated or worn kitchen up to current day standards -- a makeover that usually costs about $22,000 for the average home -- can improve the selling price of your home by thousands of dollars. The average kitchen update boosts the value of a home by up to $18,000.

Enhance your yard with a deck: According to the Balance, adding a deck in your backyard expands your living space and allows you to add value to your home. The average cost of a wood deck is $10,000 -- and that deck adds an average of $9000 to your home's value, making it easy to add space without a huge investment. 

Replace siding: The curb appeal of your home has a significant impact on your ability to sell it and on the price you receive. According to the Balance, replacing aging siding with a similar quality new version allows you to recover about 75% of your investment. It will also make your home more appealing to buyers. 

Projects that Don't Add Value to your Home

You should not take on these projects if you truly want to enjoy the results for a while, as they won't have much of an impact on the selling price or value of your home. Some, like swimming pools, can even scare away buyers that would otherwise be interested in your property. According to the Balance, the worst home upgrades include swimming pools of all types, interior painting (because buyers may prefer different colors) and whole roof replacement (except in emergencies).  

 




Loading